Propane Safety

Tips:

  • If a pilot light goes out or is very difficult to ignite, there may be a problem. DO NOT try to fix it yourself; call a professional!
  • Frequently check the vents of your appliances to be sure that excess gases can flow easily outside.
  • Have older appliances (>20 years) regularly inspected by a qualified technician.
  • Flammable vapors are a safety hazard! The pilot light on propane appliances can ignite vapors from flammable liquids.
  • Propane smells like rotten eggs, a skunk’s spray, or a dead animal. However, it may be difficult for some people to detect the odor, especially the elderly and people who smoke.
  • Odor fade is the unintended reduction in the concentration of the odor of propane. This makes the smell more difficult to detect. Although rare, odor fade can be caused by the presence of air, water, or rust in a propane tank or cylinder, as well as the passage of leaking propane through soil.

If you smell gas:

DO

  • Immediately extinguish all flammable materials
  • Shut off the gas!
  • Open windows and doors to increase ventilation
  • If the source cannot be detected, evacuate everyone from the building
  • Report the leak!

DON'T

  • Operate lights, appliances, telephones, or cell phones; flames or sparks from certain equipment can trigger an explosion or fire
  • Return to the building until it is inspected and declared safe
  • Ignore the smell of propane, even if no detector is sounding an alarm


Contact us for more information.




Propane


Technician on Truck



Warnings For Propane Safety
How to Read Your Propane Tank Gauge

Numbers indicate the percentage of gas remaining in the tank. Look at the gauge attached to the tank with the numbers from 5 to 95. (Don’t confuse it with the pressure gauge, with numbers from 0-300.)



Don’t Get Caught Out of Gas!
You have learned to keep a close eye on your car’s gas gauge. Running out of gasoline is not just an inconvenience. It could place you and your loved ones at risk. You watch the gauge and fill your tank to avoid being stranded. What you might now know is you should watch the gauge on the propane tank at home.

Did you know?
The National Fire Protection Association in most cases recommends that anyone delivering propane to an out-of-gas customer or new customer perform a complete system check. Bowman Gas requires this complete system check to ensure the safety of our customers. This leak or safety check could include an inspection of all lines, appliances, regulators and control valves. A thorough safety check can take an hour or longer to complete. Bowman Gas charges for this inspection. It may be inconvenient and the propane customer could be required to be at home at the time of the inspection.

Why is this inspection necessary on out-of-gas calls?
Propane is an extremely safe energy source when used properly. These out-of-gas procedures are required to protect your family and property. Convenience, comfort, cost and safety… these are four good reasons to avoid out-of-gas situations.

Warnings For Propane Safety
READ THIS WARNING AND KEEP IT IN A SAFE, HANDY PLACE FOR FUTURE REFERENCE.

FLAMMABLE
All gas fuels, including propane, are extremely flammable and can be dangerous in small quantities. Approximately two percent (2%) propane and ninety-eight percent (98%) air can burn or explode. This means that it can be dangerous in the event of a leak.

HEAVIER THAN AIR
Propane is heavier than air. In the event of a leak, it tends to seek lower levels along the floor, and it is possible for it to exist for several hours after a leak in dangerous levels.

SMELL OF PROPANE
An odorant is added to the propane to make it smell. Under some circumstances, it is possible that the odor in the gas can fade and gas can still be present. You cannot judge the amount of gas present by the intensity of the odor.

SNIFF
You should be familiar with the odor of propane.
This line is not visible on pdf) A disagreeable odor is added to the propane so that you will be able to detect the smell easily in case a leak develops or an unlit burner is left turned on.

IS THERE A LEAK? TAKE ACTION!
How do you know if there has been a leak? By the smell! An odorant is added to the propane so that you should be able to smell it.
However, not all people can smell all odors. If you have or suspect a problem or if you detect any smell of gas, take the following steps to
prevent an accident:
SPECIFIC THINGS THAT YOU SHOULD DO IN THE EVENT OF A LEAK
a) Extinguish all smoking materials and any other flames.
b) Do not operate switches, appliances or thermostats. A spark from one of these could ignite the gas.
c) Immediately get everyone outside and away from the building.
d) Shut off the gas supply at the tank.
e) Call your propane supplier from a neighbor’s telephone.
f) Stay outside and leave the gas off until the leak has been found and fixed.
g) Let your propane supplier relight the appliance. Do not attempt to relight the appliances or furnaces yourself.
h) EVEN IF YOU CANNOT SMELL GAS, DO NOT ASSUME IT IS SAFE TO TRY TO RELIGHT APPLIANCES.

APPLIANCE GOES OUT
Here are some safety procedure you should follow when using your propane appliances:
a) Read the lighting instructions. They came with the appliance and are usually printed right on it.
b) If you smell gas, do not try to light the appliance. Since propane is heavier than air, always sniff around the floor before trying to light the pilot.
c) The pilot had a safety device. If you have trouble lighting the pilot of keeping it lit, this device is warning you about the problem.
    Call you propane supplier for assistance.
d) Don’t use tools to force any appliance control. If you can’t work the knobs, switches or buttons by hand, call your propane supplier.
    Never tamper with the controls yourself.
e) If the appliance control has been exposed to water- from flooding, for example- it must be replaced by a serviceman immediately.

OUT OF GAS
If you run out of gas, follow these steps:
a) Turn off all control valves on all your appliances.
b) Turn off the shutoff valve on the tank.
c) Call your propane supplier to arrange for delivery of gas.
d) Do not turn the gas back on yourself. Let the propane supplier do it. When you schedule your fill, try to be home so the propane supplier
    can relight your appliances.

YOUR PROPANE SYSTEM
Your propane system has four basic parts:
a) A tank of cylinder equipped with a main shutoff valve. Know where the shutoff valve is and remember its location.
    Turn clockwise to shut off gas.
b) One or more regulators to reduce pressure between the container and your appliances. Keep them covered and protected from
    the elements at all times.
c) Gas piping to carry the propane to your appliances.
d) Gas appliances.

VENTED APPLIANCES
Some appliances are required to have vents to exhaust harmful combustion gases outside.
a) If you have vented appliances, you should make sure they have been installed by a qualified appliance installer.
b) D not operate them until they have been vented properly.
c) Before each heating season, you should have the vents checked either by the installer or a qualified serviceman.
d) If you buy a used appliance, have it inspected and installed by a qualified serviceman.